dkmnow

ping channel three

I’ve come to understand that one of the primary reasons that disabled
people are so ostracized and excluded in our society is that we remind
everyone that life is a messy, fragile, difficult thing. Our very existence
flies in the face of the myth that, with the right combination of hard
work, positive thinking, willpower, and possessions, life becomes
what it’s “supposed” to be: safe, easy, and fair. Our interruption of
the cultural myth is one of the reasons that all disabled people, at
one time or another, have the experience of feeling invisible, even
when in plain sight. It also explains why our attempts at inclusion
are met with everything from good intentions that miss the mark to
the mind-boggling experience of outright hostility.

—Rachel Cohen-Rottenberg, Blazing My Trail (via reavers)

(via catharticcruella)

pantslessprogressive:

Occupy Wall Street News Roundup, Sept. 24-25
Police Brutality:
Police pen up and mace female protesters [Raw Story]
Young man arrested simply for walking down the street [laurasthinkingwithportals]
Protester thrown over barricade by police [evanfleischer]
Protester shouts, “Is this what you’re about?”, gets cuffed [@LibertyPlazaRev]
Officer pushes sitting protester, man stands up, cops arrest him [@LilKing420s]
Cops Tackle, Mace Wall St. Protesters for No Obvious Reason [Gawker]
In the News: 
Occupy Wall Street makes the Sunday cover of NY Daily News [@DhaniBagels]
NYPD Silent On Pepper Spraying Of Downtown Protesters [NY1]
‘Occupy Wall Street’ Protesters Regroup at Liberty Plaza With Pizza, Tales of Battle [NY Observer]
Wall Street protesters cuffed, pepper-sprayed during ‘inequality’ march [NY Daily News]
80 Arrested as Financial District Protest Moves North [NY Times]
Gunning for Wall Street, With Faulty Aim [NY Times]
Arrests at New York anti-Wall Street protest [Al Jazeera]
Protesters march in Manhattan, criticizing Wall Street [Reuters]
Police crack down on ‘Occupy Wall Street’ protests [Guardian]
80 arrested as ‘Occupy Wall Street’ protest of bank bailouts, mortgage crisis marches in NYC [Washington Post/AP]
Protesters march in Manhattan, criticizing Wall Street, getting arrested [MSNBC]
Dozens arrested in 8th day of ‘Occupy Wall Street’ protests [CNN]
Police Arrest 80 During ‘Occupy Wall Street’ Protest [Fox News]
80 ‘Occupy Wall Street’ Protesters Arrested [WSJ]
‘Occupy Wall Street’ Protests Turn Violent; Video Shows Police Macing Women [ABC]
Wall St protests: Police harsh, media silent? [RT]
Occupy Wall Street Calm So Far in Ninth Day [Village Voice]
Why ‘Occupy Wall Street’ makes sense [Amy Goodman]
Occupy Wall Street rediscovers the radical imagination [David Graeber]
Occupy Wall Street’s Leaderless Democracy [The Indypendent]
11 Things You Can Do to Help the ‘Occupy Wall Street’ Movement [Alternet]
Must Watch: 9/11 first responder occupies Wall Street [evanfleischer]
Check out Occupy Together, a new site listing occupation movements across the country.
Email NY-based journalists and urge them to cover the protest [inothernews]
Watch the Global Revolution livestream.
Follow Evan Fleischer for a steady stream of news from the Occupy Wall Street movement.
[Photo: Alex Fradkin]

pantslessprogressive:

Occupy Wall Street News Roundup, Sept. 24-25

Police Brutality:

Police pen up and mace female protesters [Raw Story]

Young man arrested simply for walking down the street [laurasthinkingwithportals]

Protester thrown over barricade by police [evanfleischer]

Protester shouts, “Is this what you’re about?”, gets cuffed [@LibertyPlazaRev]

Officer pushes sitting protester, man stands up, cops arrest him [@LilKing420s]

Cops Tackle, Mace Wall St. Protesters for No Obvious Reason [Gawker]

In the News: 

Occupy Wall Street makes the Sunday cover of NY Daily News [@DhaniBagels]

NYPD Silent On Pepper Spraying Of Downtown Protesters [NY1]

‘Occupy Wall Street’ Protesters Regroup at Liberty Plaza With Pizza, Tales of Battle [NY Observer]

Wall Street protesters cuffed, pepper-sprayed during ‘inequality’ march [NY Daily News]

80 Arrested as Financial District Protest Moves North [NY Times]

Gunning for Wall Street, With Faulty Aim [NY Times]

Arrests at New York anti-Wall Street protest [Al Jazeera]

Protesters march in Manhattan, criticizing Wall Street [Reuters]

Police crack down on ‘Occupy Wall Street’ protests [Guardian]

80 arrested as ‘Occupy Wall Street’ protest of bank bailouts, mortgage crisis marches in NYC [Washington Post/AP]

Protesters march in Manhattan, criticizing Wall Street, getting arrested [MSNBC]

Dozens arrested in 8th day of ‘Occupy Wall Street’ protests [CNN]

Police Arrest 80 During ‘Occupy Wall Street’ Protest [Fox News]

80 ‘Occupy Wall Street’ Protesters Arrested [WSJ]

‘Occupy Wall Street’ Protests Turn Violent; Video Shows Police Macing Women [ABC]

Wall St protests: Police harsh, media silent? [RT]

Occupy Wall Street Calm So Far in Ninth Day [Village Voice]

Why ‘Occupy Wall Street’ makes sense [Amy Goodman]

Occupy Wall Street rediscovers the radical imagination [David Graeber]

Occupy Wall Street’s Leaderless Democracy [The Indypendent]

11 Things You Can Do to Help the ‘Occupy Wall Street’ Movement [Alternet]

Must Watch: 9/11 first responder occupies Wall Street [evanfleischer]

Check out Occupy Together, a new site listing occupation movements across the country.

Email NY-based journalists and urge them to cover the protest [inothernews]

Watch the Global Revolution livestream.

Follow Evan Fleischer for a steady stream of news from the Occupy Wall Street movement.

[Photo: Alex Fradkin]

(Source: pantslessprogressive, via questionablenerdlygoodness)

Unwarranted Conclusions and the Potential for Harm

nekobakaz:

It’s my contention that calling a physical inability to see and to interpret nonverbal signals a failure of any kind of empathy is to make an unmerited interpretive leap. After all, people who are blind cannot see and interpret nonverbal signals — they rely upon spoken language and/or Braille text — and yet, to my knowledge, no one has alleged that blindness is a low-empathy condition. Blind people come to understand the mental states of other people through other means, just as autistic people do. And yet, for an autistic person, a problem seeing and interpreting visual phenomena — and the necessity of taking alternative routes to acquiring the information expressed by such phenomena — is the basis for defining autism as an empathy disorder.

- Quote from post linked to, written by Rachel Cohen-Rottenberg, in response to Simon Baron-Cohen’s reply to her criticisms about his views on Autism and Empathy.

(via nicocoer)

10 Things Anyone Can Do To Help Exonerate Innocent People and Prevent Wrongful Convictions

1. Get connected to stay informed and take action
Join the Innocence Project’s online community to receive regular updates, action alerts, in-depth news and analysis, and other information. Registration is free. Click here to join. Once you register, you can e-mail your friends, family and colleagues to ask them to sign up, too.

2. Donate to the Innocence Project
The Innocence Project is a nonprofit organization that relies on financial support from individuals and foundations. Your donation will help pay for DNA tests, provide staffing for case intake and litigation, support our reform initiatives nationwide, and help educate the public. Click to donate online or by mail.

3. Build relationships with elected representatives 
Call or meet with your state and federal representatives well before the legislative session starts and discuss your concerns. By simply introducing yourself to your legislators and their staff before the session starts and providing a brief overview of innocence-related policy concerns, you can establish useful relationships with them and help them see the value of supporting legislation that would protect the innocent. When the session starts, they may reach out to you or take your call because they know you’re actively involved in these issues. For more information and practical tips, see “How to Talk About Innocence-Related Issues with Elected Officials, Organizations, Media, and Others.”

4. Connect with a local Innocence Network organization
Three dozen organizations around the country belong to the Innocence Network, and many of them work on these issues at the state and local levels. You may be able to help with their policy reform efforts, their community outreach, or other aspects of their work – in a professional capacity or as a volunteer. To find a local Innocence Network contact, go to www.innocencenetwork.org.

5. Reach out to the media 
When a local or national media outlet runs a story about an exoneration or the causes of wrongful convictions, call or write to the reporter to say you are pleased to see the coverage and interested in seeing additional stories on these issues. Share your perspective and thoughts about why wrongful convictions must be discussed and addressed. Write letters to the editor in response to articles or editorials so that the media – and policymakers who are in a position to help prevent wrongful convictions — know that the public is concerned about these issues. For more information and practical tips, see “How to Talk About Innocence-Related Issues with Elected Officials, Organizations, Media, and Others.”

6. Become more knowledgeable about wrongful convictions – and spread the word
There are scores of books, films, television specials and other resources that can deepen people’s understanding of the causes of wrongful convictions, the need for reform, the challenges people face after exoneration and other issues. Spend some time learning more about the issues, and then share books or films with your friends, coworkers or community members (some of them are great gifts!).View a list of list of films and TV specials on the issues surrounding wrongful convictions and view our recommended reading list.

7. Engage allies in addressing wrongful convictions

Everyone is impacted by wrongful convictions, but some individuals and groups aren’t yet involved in preventing injustice. Ask your friends, colleagues and community organizations to get involved when policy reforms are being discussed; encourage them to join the Innocence Project’s online community. Offer to speak about wrongful convictions at a local Rotary, Kiwanis, or similar civic groups’ meeting. You can address the group yourself, or you can ask a local Innocence Network representative or professor to speak. During the speech, encourage people to become more actively involved in these issues.

8. Work with prisoners and their families in your community

Many exonerees and their families talk about how isolated and ignored prisoners feel. Find a local group that works with prisoners and volunteer to get involved however you’re needed – whether it’s helping in a prison organization’s office or providing support to prisoners and their families. For links to organizations providing a range of services, go to http://prisonactivist.org/links/. For information to share with prisoners (or their families) seeking to contact the Innocence Project about a case, click here.

9. Learn about local procedures and help improve them

Many of the causes of wrongful convictions are decided locally. For example, policies and procedures about conducting lineups and recording interrogations are often set by city and county agencies. As a concerned community member, you have the right to know what the local practices are. Contact the city police, county sheriff and/or other local agencies to find out what they’re currently doing and what the process is for evaluating and revising their policies. If their procedures and policies are not adequate for preventing wrongful convictions, urge decision-makers to change them and reach out to Innocence Network groups to let them know what you’ve learned. For more information and practical tips, see “How to Learn About Local Law Enforcement Procedures and Help Improve Them.”

10. Host a local fundraising and educational event

You, your friends or a group you belong to can organize an event to raise money for the Innocence Project and educate people about wrongful convictions. Some people hold small house parties for six people, while others organize events for 100. Whatever you can do will help spread the word and support our work. Click here to get started on holding an event.

(Source: dignified-and-old, via nicocoer)

Who Would Jesus Execute?

We can never judge the lives of others, because each person knows only their own pain and renunciation. It’s one thing to feel that you are on the right path, but it’s another to think that yours is the only path.

—Paulo Coelho (via 1beauty)

(Source: entropy-entropy, via nicocoer)

How To Differentiate Between Autism and Asperger's Syndrome, Once and For All

fragmentsofstuff:

Note: This is sarcastic. People making nonsensical divisions between autistic people, either via diagnostic categories or functioning levels, is a fucking sore point.

(I’m especially irritated when other autistic people buy into it. Which I have seen far too much even in just the past few months to think aspie supremacism isn’t a real problem like some people on Tumblr have suggested.)

(via disabilityrightsstuff-deactivat)

Autist's Corner: Simon Baron-Cohen Responds to Criticism from an Autistic Blogger - Part I

No, I am glad he understands that we care about other people, too. I still disagree somewhat with his assessment of our difficulties with cognitive empathy; that, I think, stems as much from our being profoundly different from other people in terms of our sensory and emotional responses as it does from any objective inability to “read” other people. I think he ignores just how badly non-autistic people fail to notice the signs of our distress, or misinterpret our body language or tone of voice. I think they are just as bad at reading us as we are at reading them; it’s just that because they’re the majority, their failure to understand us is not as disabling as our failure to understand them.

(Source: clatterbane)